Deepavali:

A colorful festival of the Hindus that is celebrated worldwide is Deepavali (Diwali), which is also known as the festival of lights. This festival usually falls around late October and November. One important practice that the Hindus follow during the festival is to light oil lamps in their homes on Deepavali morning. By lighting the oil lamps, the Hindus are thanking the gods for the happiness, knowledge, peace and wealth that they have received. The Hindus consider Deepavali as one of the most important festivals to celebrate.

The Legend –

There is even an interesting legend behind this festival. The story goes that Narakasura, a demon, ruled the kingdom of Pradyoshapuram. Under his rule, the villagers suffered a lot of hardship as the demon tortured the people and kidnapped the women to be imprisoned in his palace. Seeing his wickedness, Lord Khrishna set out to destroy the demon and the day Narakasura died was celebrated as Deepavali, the triumph of good over evil!

Preparations –

Preparation for Deepavali starts usually at least two to three weeks before the festival. It is known that the Hindus will be busy cleaning their houses to prepare for the festival. Some would even renovate their houses to prepare it for Deepavali. Usually the family will shop for new clothes and for accessories to decorate their homes Prior to the festival, Indian shops will be selling festive items like Deepavali greeting cards, Punjabi suits and flowers. The Hindus will frequent these shops when they are shopping for Deepavali.

Celebrations –

The Hindus usually awake early in the morning of deepavali around 3am and the first ritual will be having an oil bath, which is an important feature of Deepavali. Hindus will be dressed in their new clothes on Deepavali. Most of the ladies would be clad in silk saris or Punjabi suits of various bright shades. Hindus particularly dislike dressing in black on that day, as they consider black an inauspicious color for the festival. Hindus would also pay their respects to the elderly and most families would go to the temple after having breakfast. This is also an important practice for them. The reason why they would be going to the temples is to pray to get happiness and prosperity on Deepavali. The houses would be decorated with oil lamps and children will play with firecrackers to celebrate the festival. On the first day, they would not go visiting but would stay at home to welcome the guests who visit them.

Food –

Visiting Hindus during Deepavali will be an interesting activity, as you will get to taste a wide variety of delicious food. In every home that you visit you are bound to be served with a tempting spread of sweets. Some of the popular sweets are halwa, burfi and laddu. Hindus love eating spicy food and for non-vegetarians they indulge in favorites like chicken tandoori, prawn sambal and fish head curry. In homes of Hindus who are vegetarians popular dishes like thosais, idlis and naans are prepared.

  • May This Diwali be as bright as ever.
  • May this Diwali bring joy, health and wealth to you.
  • May the festival of lights brighten up you and your near and dear ones lives.
  • May this Diwali bring in u the most brightest and choicest happiness and love you have ever Wished for.
  • May this Diwali bring you the utmost in peace and prosperity.
  • May lights triumph over darkness.
  • May peace transcend the earth.
  • May the spirit of light illuminate the world.
  • May the light that we celebrate at Diwali show us the way and lead us together on the path of peace and social harmony

“WISH U A VERY HAPPY DIWALI” .

  • This Diwali, may you be blessed with good fortune as long as Ganeshji’s trunk, wealth and prosperity as big as his stomach, happiness as sweet as his ladoos and may your trouble be as small as his mouse. Happy Diwali!
  • May you be blessed with happiness and well being to last through the year. Happy Diwali!
  • A warm Diwali wish for every happiness. May the warmth and splendor, that are a part of this auspicious occasion, fill your life with happiness and bright cheer, and bring to you joy and prosperity, for the whole year.
  • May the festival of lights be the harbinger of joy and prosperity. As the holy occasion of Diwali is here and the atmosphere is filled with the spirit of mirth and love, here’s hoping this festival of beauty brings your way, bright sparkles of contentment, that stay with you through the days ahead. Best wishes on Diwali and New year.
  • On Diwali, wishes for every joy and prosperity. Here’s hoping, that the beauty of this festival of lights, bring a world of joy, happiness and contentment to you, to last the whole year through. Happy Diwali.
  • As your celebrate this holy occasion, the most loving thoughts and wishes are for you… May the beauty of Diwali fill your world and your heart and may the love that is always yours, bring you endless joy. Have A Wonderful Diwali And New Year!
  • Have a prosperous Diwali. Hope this festival of lights, brings you every joy and happiness. May the lamps of joy, illuminate your life and fill your days with the bright sparkles of peace, mirth and goodwill, because you are someone who deserves life’s best and so much more. Have a joyous Diwali and new year.
  • As you celebrate this holy occasion, you are wished the brightest moments that Diwali can bring, lots of love and laughter to fill your days with cheer and a New year that is sure to bring you, the best of everything.
  • There’s always something warm and bright, about this time of the year, when everything has a special glow, and hearts are full of cheer, that’s why, this special greeting comes your way, to wish you all life’s best, on Diwali and in the coming year, too.
  • May the warmth and splendor, that are a part of this auspicious occasion, fill your life with happiness and bright cheer, and bring to you joy and prosperity, for the whole year.

Donkey’s are generally considered stupid and the dumbest creatures on earth, but this donkey in this story has thought us what exactly life is all about:

THE STORY:

One day a farmer’s donkey fell down into a well.
The animal cried piteously for hours as the farmer tried to figure out
what to do.

Finally, he decided the animal was old, and the well needed to be covered
up anyway;

it just wasn’t worth it to retrieve the donkey. He invited all his
neighbors to come
over and help him.

They all grabbed a shovel and began to shovel dirt into the well.

At first, the donkey realized what was happening and cried horribly.

Then, to everyone’s amazement he quieted down. A few shovel loads later,
the farmer
finally looked down the well. He was astonished at what he saw.

With each shovel of dirt that hit his back, the donkey was doing something
amazing.

He would shake it off and take a step up.

As the farmer’s neighbors continued to shovel dirt on top of the animal,

he would shake it off and take a step up.

Pretty soon, everyone was amazed as the donkey

stepped up over the edge of the well and happily trotted off!

MORAL OF THE STORY:

Life is going to shovel dirt on you, all kinds of dirt.

The trick to getting out of the well is to shake it off and take a step up.

Each of our troubles is a stepping stone.

We can get out of the deepest wells just by not stopping, never give up!
Shake it off and take a step up.

Vinayaka Chavathi in India.

Posted: September 7, 2008 in Uncategorized

‘Vinayak Chaturthi’ or ‘Vinayaka Chavithi’ the great Ganesha festival, also known as “Ganesh chaturthi” is celebrated by Hindus around the world as the birthday of Lord Ganesha. It is observed during the Hindu Month of Bhadra (mid-August to mid-September) and the grandest and most elaborate of them, especially in the western India state of Maharashtra, lasts for 10 days, ending on the day of ‘Ananta Chaturdashi’.

The Grand Celebration

A life-like clay model of Lord Ganesha is made 2-3 months prior to the day of Ganesh Chaturthi. The size of this idol may vary from 3/4th of an inch to over 43 feet.

On the day of the festival, it is placed on raised platforms in homes or in elaborately decorated outdoor tents for people to view and pay their homage. The priest, usually clad in red silk dhoti and shawl, then invokes life into the idol amidst the chanting of mantras. This ritual is called ‘pranapratishhtha’. After this the ‘shhodashopachara’ (16 ways of paying tribute) follows. Coconut, jaggery, 21 ‘modakas’ (rice flour preparation), 21 ‘durva’ (trefoil) blades and red flowers are offered. The idol is anointed with red unguent or sandal paste (rakta chandan). Throughout the ceremony, Vedic hymns from the Rig Veda and Ganapati Atharva Shirsha Upanishad, and Ganesha stotra from the Narada Purana are chanted.

For 10 days, from Bhadrapad Shudh Chaturthi to the Ananta Chaturdashi, Ganesha is worshipped. On the 11th day, the image is taken through the streets in a procession accompanied with dancing, singing, to be immersed in a river or the sea symbolizing a ritual see-off of the Lord in his journey towards his abode in Kailash while taking away with him the misfortunes of all man. All join in this final procession shouting “Ganapathi Bappa Morya, Purchya Varshi Laukariya” (O father Ganesha, come again early next year). After the final offering of coconuts, flowers and camphor is made, people carry the idol to the river to immerse it.

The whole community comes to worship Ganesha in beautifully done tents. These also serve as the venue for free medical checkup, blood donation camps, charity for the poor, dramatic performances, films, devotional songs, etc. during the days of the festival.

There are also many varieties of ways in which ganesh pandals are decorated in the cities,

The largest ganesh in India every year is in khairtabad it always ranges between the 40-45 ft mark.

largest ganesh in India

largest ganesh in India

Happy Vinayaka Chavathi to one and all

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